Snap FAQ

AA-00343

Snap

 

What type of material is Snap?

 

Snap is a polyethyl methacrylate.

 

What are the advantages of polyethyl methacrylates (Snap) when compared to polymethyl methacrylates (Jet)?

 

The following are advantages of polyethyl methacrylates:

  1. Lower exotherm temperature during curing. (Does not generate as much heat while curing.)
  2. Kinder to vital pulps due to the lower exotherm temperature.
  3. Less polymerization shrinkage.
  4. Better marginal adaptation as a result of lower polymerization shrinkage.
  5. Ideal for relining lab processed temps. Polyethyl methacrylates (Snap) and lab processed temporaries combine the best of both worlds for long span temps.  The strength of lab processed temporaries and the marginal fit of the polyethyl methacrylate.

 

What is the exotherm temperature of Snap?

 

Our-in house lab tests recorded Snap’s exotherm temperature to be 144.2° F.

 

What is the exotherm temperature of polymethyl methacrylate products?

 

Our in house testing of several polymethyl methacrylate products showed an exotherm temperature range of between 174° - 185° F.

 

How can I match the Snap shades to the Vita/Lumen shade guide?

 

The following chart can be a guide in providing an approximate conversion of the Snap shades to the Vita/Lumen shades.  (Important:  Porcelain and acrylic are very different materials so the match will not be exact.)

                        Snap              Vita/Lumen

                        60                          B1

61                          B2

62                          A2

                        65                          A3/D3

                        69                          C2/D4

                        77                          B3/B4

                        81                          A3.5/B3

                        Bleach                      ---

                        Clear                         ---

 

How white is the Bleach shade?                

 

You can expect the bleach shade of Snap to be similar in color to white porcelain bathroom fixtures.

 

The bleach shade is very white and opaque, is there anything I can do to tone it down?

 

Yes.  If you add some of the clear powder to the bleach powder, the resulting temporary will be less bright and stark.

 

Is there a way to modify the shades so I can get a closer match to the adjacent teeth?

 

Yes.  You can modify the standard shades by adding some bleach shade powder to them.  The addition of the bleach shade powder allows you to lighten and add opacity to the standard shades.

 

What is the shelf life of the Snap components?

 

You can expect about a 3 year shelf life from your Snap line of materials.

 

Can I use Snap for long span temporary bridges?

 

Yes, Snap can be used for long span temporaries.

 

What type of material is more fracture resistant for long span temporaries?

 

Polymethyl methacrylates are usually considered stronger and more fracture resistant than polyethyl methacrylates for long span bridges.

 

Why has the monomer liquid in the brown bottle solidified?

 

The most common reason for this occurrence is that the tip of the dropper became contaminated with Snap powder.  If Snap powder gets into the liquid (even the smallest amount) the chemical reaction begins and the liquid will eventually solidify.

 

How should I store Snap in my office?

 

Store Snap in a dark, cool location that does not expose the monomer to sunlight.

 

Can I repair the margins of Snap temps with composite? 

 

While it may be possible to bond some composite to a Snap temporary, the long term possibility of success is unlikely.  We therefore do not recommend using composite to repair Snap temporary restorations.  To minimize the likelihood of future problems, repairs should be made utilizing the same material that was used when the temporary was fabricated.

 

Can I repair the margins of Snap temps with a Bis-acryl temporary material such as Parkell’s SmarTemp?

 

Bis-acryl products are composite materials.  We therefore do not recommend using them for repairs to Snap temporary restorations.  As is the case with light cure composites, the long term possibility of a successful repair of a Snap temporary restoration with a bis-acryl product is unlikely.  To minimize the likelihood of future problems, repairs should be made utilizing the same material that was used when the temporary was fabricated.